The Postcard Post

IMG_7980

If I’m going to be talking about slowness on this site, I will have to start with one of my favourite slow things of all time: postcards.

I love postcards.

I love sending them. I love receiving them. I love that they take so long to get where they are going that you forget you sent them in the first place. I love that they were there with the writer, that they made a journey to get to the reader, and that they show signs of adventures they can never tell anyone about. I just love them.

I also love that everything about the postcard process is slow.

I deliberate endlessly over cards, making sure to get one that I think the person receiving it will appreciate. I take some time to think about that person, what they find interesting, what they enjoy doing, and of the stories or experiences from my trip that would appeal most to them. I write deliberately and use up every inch of the card (often forgetting room for stamps and addresses). And I always send a little wish when I drop it into the post box that it survives the journey (mostly intact) and gets there eventually, even though I know it can sometimes take months to arrive.

A Postcard a Day

When I was travelling in Southeast Asia a couple of years ago, I decided to take on a postcard project – one postcard a day, every day, for 30 days. Because I like the idea that the card was actually there with the person writing it (that it smells all the smells, sees all the sights and hears all the sounds around it while it is being written on), I thought of taking a photo of the card in the place I wrote it, so that, along with the card and my message, the recipient could get a little taste of the experience it went through as well.

Here’s what some of them looked like:

Jaisalmer, India. I took about 20 photos until I got the fort lined up exactly with the photo on the card.

Jaisalmer, India. I took about 20 photos until I got the fort lined up exactly with the photo on the card.

Chiang Mai, Thailand. I ate that soup pretty much every day. Two and a half years later, I am still tortured by its absence.

Chiang Mai, Thailand. I ate that soup pretty much every day. Two and a half years later, I am still tortured by its absence.

A small village on the Annapurna circuit. I had sandals on that gave me blisters. The tape was meant to protect me but it gave me more blisters.

A small village on the Annapurna circuit, Nepal. I had sandals on that gave me blisters. The tape was meant to protect me. It gave me more blisters.

Marpha, Nepal. Playing with a little perspective. It had been a long walk and we were all feeling pretty silly.

Marpha, Nepal. Playing with a little perspective. It was a long walk and we were all feeling pretty silly.

Bamboo, Nepal. The long, steep, stone staircase we had to climb and descend. Twice.

Bamboo, Nepal. The long, steep, stone staircase we had to climb and descend. Twice.

Kathmandu, Nepal. The secret story of the bite marks on the card.

Kathmandu, Nepal. The secret story of the bite marks on the card.

(note: If you want to see all the cards in the series, you can find them here).

I had a lot of fun writing these cards and taking the photos that go with them, so I decided it’s time to revive my postcard project.

Do you want a postcard?

While I can’t pretend to have the time or money to send a postcard every day, I am hoping to send one a week for as long as people keep requesting them. I’ll post up the photos of the cards as I send them with a note about where I wrote it and where it is travelling to (with no mention of your name or address, obviously!).

Over the next eight weeks I will be in Salt Lake City, St. Louis, London and Muscat. It would be great to send cards to you from all of those places!

If you want a card, send your address through Postcards page at the top, or click here for the form.

I look forward to writing to you!

PS. If you feel weird sending your address to a stranger, don’t worry, I’m mostly normal. I will be the only one who sees it and I will delete it after I send your card.

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “The Postcard Post

  1. Supriya says:

    “I love that they were there with the writer, that they made a journey to get to the reader, and that they show signs of adventures they can never tell anyone about. I just love them.” – I couldn’t agree more with you on that!! I make sure to send a post card to my sister from every country that I travel too. One particular postcard from UK to the US took nearly 4 months to get there. It was pretty worn out when it reached its destination but I believe it was worth the trouble 🙂

    Like

    • ThreeMilesanHour.com says:

      That is a perfect example! I wonder what it saw along the way :). I am glad to hear you send them too! I would love to send you one if you want. There is a form on the postcards page you can fill out and I will get one off to you really soon 🙂

      Like

  2. Jameela says:

    I would love a card from you but I don’t have an address yet (one of the downside of my life on the road I guess) but I’ll fill in the form when I’m in Saudi. Maybe I can send you one back afterwards if you’d like

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s